Tropical Fish Secrets
It's always fun when a guest comes into my home for the first time... you can see their eyes light up like a little kids' and exclaim, "Wow, an aquarium!" as they make a "B-line" for it and proceed to gawk in amazement!
Tropical Fish Secrets

Sunday, April 23, 2006

Water conditions

The solute content of water is perhaps the most important aspect of water conditions, as dissolved salts and other constituents can dramatically impact basic water chemistry, and therefore how organisms are able to interact with their environment. Salt content, or salinity, is the most basic classification of water conditions. An aquarium may have fresh water (a salt level of < 0.5%), simulating a lake or river environment; salt water (a salt level of 5%–18%), simulating an ocean or sea environment; or brackish water (a salt level of 0.5%–5%), simulating environments lying between fresh and salt, such as estuaries.
Several other water characteristics result from dissolved contents of the water, and are important to the proper simulation of natural environments. The pH of the water is a measure of the degree to which it is alkaline or acidic. Hardness measures overall dissolved mineral content; hard or soft water may be preferred. Dissolved organic content and dissolved gases content are also important factors.
Home aquarists typically use modified tap water supplied through their local water supply network to fill their tanks. For freshwater aquaria, additives formulated to remove chlorine or chloramine (used to disinfect drinking water supplies for human consumption) are often all that is needed to make the water ready for aquarium use. Brackish or saltwater aquaria require the addition of a mixture of salts and other minerals, which are commercially available for this purpose. More sophisticated aquarists may make other modifications to their base water source to modify the water's alkalinity, hardness, or dissolved content of organics and gases, before adding it to their aquaria. In contrast, public aquaria with large water needs often locate themselves near a natural water source (such as a river, lake, or ocean) in order to have easy access to a large volume of water that does not require much further treatment.

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home

Tropical Fish Secrets
It's always fun when a guest comes into my home for the first time... you can see their eyes light up like a little kids' and exclaim, "Wow, an aquarium!" as they make a "B-line" for it and proceed to gawk in amazement!
Tropical Fish Secrets