Tropical Fish Secrets
It's always fun when a guest comes into my home for the first time... you can see their eyes light up like a little kids' and exclaim, "Wow, an aquarium!" as they make a "B-line" for it and proceed to gawk in amazement!
Tropical Fish Secrets

Saturday, April 22, 2006

Design

The common freshwater aquarium maintained by a home aquarist typically includes a filtration system, an artificial lighting system, air pumps, and a heater. In addition, some freshwater tanks (and most saltwater tanks) use powerheads to increase water circulation.
Combined biological and mechanical filtration systems are now common; these are designed to remove potentially dangerous build up of nitrogenous wastes and phosphates dissolved in the water, as well as particulate matter. Filtration systems are the most complexly engineered component of most home aquaria, and various designs are used. Most systems use pumps to remove a small portion of the tank's water to an external pathway where filtration occurs; the filtered water is then returned to the aquarium. Protein skimmers, filtration devices that remove proteins and other waste from the water, are usually found only in salt water aquaria.
Air pumps are employed to adequately oxygenate (or in the case of a heavily planted aquarium, provide carbon dioxide to) the water. These devices, once universal, are now somewhat less commonly used as some newer filtration systems create enough surface agitation to supply adequate gas exchange at the surface. Aquarium heaters are designed to act as thermostats to regulate water temperature at a level designated by the aquarist when the prevailing temperature of air surrounding the aquarium is below the desired water temperature. Coolers are also available for use in cold water aquaria or in parts of the world where the ambient room temperature is above the desired tank temperature.
An aquarium's physical characteristics form another aspect of aquarium design. Size, lighting conditions, density of floating and rooted plants, placement of bogwood, creation of caves or overhangs, type of substrate, and other factors (including an aquarium's positioning within a room) can all affect the behavior and survivability of tank inhabitants.
The combined function of these elements is to maintain appropriate water quality and characteristics suitable for the aquarium's residents.

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Tropical Fish Secrets
It's always fun when a guest comes into my home for the first time... you can see their eyes light up like a little kids' and exclaim, "Wow, an aquarium!" as they make a "B-line" for it and proceed to gawk in amazement!
Tropical Fish Secrets